Miranda July

Filmmaker, Artist & Writer

Miranda July is a filmmaker, artist, and writer. Her videos, performances, and web-based projects have been presented at sites such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum and in two Whitney Biennials. July wrote, directed and starred in her first feature-length film, Me and You and Everyone We Know (2005), which won a special jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival and four prizes at the Cannes Film Festival, including the Camera d’Or. Miranda July’s most recent film is The Future (2011), which she wrote and directed and stars in.

Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, Harper’s, and The New Yorker; her collection of stories, No One Belongs Here More Than You (Scribner, 2007), won the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and has been published in twenty countries. Her latest book is It Chooses You (McSweeney’s, 2011). Her novel The First Bad Man will be published in January 2015 by Scribner.

In 2000 July created the seminal participatory website, Learning to Love You More, with artist Harrell Fletcher and a companion book was published in 2007 (Prestel); the work is now in collection of The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She designed Eleven Heavy Things, an interactive sculpture garden, for the 2009 Venice Biennale; it was also presented in Union Square in New York (2010)and by MOCA in Los Angeles (2011). Her email-based artwork, We Think Alone (commissioned by Magasin 3, Stockholm), launched in July 2013 with nearly 100 thousand subscribers and continues through November 2013. Raised in Berkeley, California, she currently lives in Los Angeles.

 

Visit http://www.facebook.com/julymiranda

"Miranda July's ability to pervert norms while embracing what makes us normal is astounding. Writing in the first person with the frank, odd lilt of an utterly truthful character, she will make you laugh, cringe and recognize yourself in a woman you never planned to be. By the time July tackles motherhood, the book has become a bible. Never has a novel spoken so deeply to my sexuality, my spirituality, my secret self. I know I am not alone." —Lena Dunham [on Miranda July’s novel, The First Bad Man]
"July’s small-scale film reveals cinematic smarts—an awareness of how images evoke emotions and ideas—of a precise and rare mastery, and they’re yoked to a bracingly perceptive, nuanced, and unified worldview. The Future is a major work of art." The New Yorker
"She's completely intuitive. There are no schools of writing working themselves out in her. No history of literature. She just does what she does, and as a result she's a complete original." —Rick Moody
Miranda July©Todd Cole